J.P. Jones

J.P. JONES is the perfect all-around hunting and outdoor knife. The O1 tool steel full tang blade has an overall length of 9″. The 5″ blade is perfect for dressing any game and tasks around camp. Complementing the exotic Zebrawood and Macassar Ebony of this knife are black liners and stainless pins. A handcrafted leather sheath is included with J.P. Jones.

Overall Length: 9”

Blade Length: 5”

 

$175.00

Availability: 24 in stock (can be backordered)

American Hero

John Paul Jones

July 6, 1747 Arbigland, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland– July 18, 1792 Paris, France, buried Naval Academy Chapel, Annapolis, Maryland

John Paul Jones
John Paul Jones

John Paul Jones was the United States’ first well-known naval commander in the American Revolutionary War. He made many friends and enemies—who accused him of piracy—among America’s political elites, and his actions in British waters during the Revolution earned him an international reputation which persists to this day. As such, he is sometimes referred to as the “Father of the American Navy” (a sobriquet he shares with John Barry and John Adams).

On April 20, 1778, Jones learned from captured sailors that the Royal Navy sloop of war HMS Drake was anchored off Carrickfergus, Ireland. According to the diary of Ranger‘s surgeon, Jones’s first intention was to attack the vessel in broad daylight, but his sailors were “unwilling to undertake it” (another incident omitted from the official report). Therefore, the attack took place just after midnight, but the mate responsible for dropping the anchor to halt Ranger right alongside Drake misjudged the timing in the dark (Jones claimed in his memoirs that the man was drunk), so Jones had to cut his anchor cable and run. The wind shifted, and Ranger recrossed the Irish Sea to make another attempt at raiding Whitehaven. Jones led the assault with two boats of fifteen men just after midnight on April 23, 1778, hoping to set fire to and sink all Whitehaven’s ships anchored in harbor, which numbered between 200 and 400 wooden vessels and consisted of a full merchant fleet and many coal transporters. They also hoped to terrorize the townspeople by lighting further fires. As it happened, the journey to shore was slowed by the still-shifting wind, as well as a strong ebb tide. They successfully spiked the town’s big defensive guns to prevent them being fired, but lighting fires proved difficult, as the lanterns in both boats had run out of fuel. To remedy this, some of the party were sent to raid a public house on the quayside, but the temptation to stop for a quick drink led to a further delay. Dawn was breaking by the time they returned and began the arson attacks, so efforts were concentrated on the coal ship Thompson in the hope that the flames would spread to adjacent vessels, all grounded by the low tide. However, in the twilight, one of the crew slipped away and alerted residents on a harbourside street. A fire alert was sounded, and large numbers of people came running to the quay, forcing the Americans to retreat, and extinguishing the flames with the town’s two fire-engines. The townspeople’s hopes of sinking Jones’s boats with cannon fire were dashed because of the prudent spiking.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Paul_Jones

*note: Discrepancies (particularly in dates and names) are left as printed from their original sources. Due to the lack of status among non-whites historically, records were not accurately kept.

J.P. Jones

Category
Scroll to Top